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  #91  
Old 15th February 2019, 19:53
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^^ That is what I thought, one person could have Asperger's (which I know isn't necessarily a diagnosis anymore) and another could have severe autism and be non verbal but they are both on the autistic spectrum.
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  #92  
Old 15th February 2019, 20:05
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougella
^^ That is what I thought, one person could have Asperger's (which I know isn't necessarily a diagnosis anymore) and another could have severe autism and be non verbal but they are both on the autistic spectrum.
Yes, Asperger's is no longer separate and falls under ASD now. Two children at either end of the spectrum would be incredibly different.
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  #93  
Old 16th February 2019, 18:38
Melangell Melangell is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I think calling it a spectrum is part of the problem. Where's the medical evidence that backs up these children have the same condition? The fact that Aspergers is no longer a viable diagnosis says a lot, these are discriptive, rather than diagnostic. I believe that we don't know what the route of these problems are yet, describing a set of traits doesn't make a medical diagnosis to me, it's so easy to fit those traits to different people at different times,if I was the kind of person that liked labels I am sure I could have pushed for a diagnosis for my eldest, who had obsessions, echolalia and poor social skills, but who is now a happy, sociable, high achieving child. I just don't think 'high functioning asd' is a medical condition, if anything at all its just a personality type.
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  #94  
Old 16th February 2019, 18:55
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I don't really think of autism as a medical condition, in the same way that epilepsy, for example, is a medical condition. Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition. I do agree that it can be difficult to diagnose and there are no solid causes as of yet. I think autism is more than a set of traits though, there is a triad of impairment and simply having a trait such as echolalia would not necessarily be indicative of autism. Echolalia can be linked to speech and language difficulties, which in turn could cause poor social skills.

Again, with obsessions, it's more than just an intense interest or hobby. A child in my class at the moment who is clearly autistic, absolutely loves windmills. All he wants to make are windmills. He will look at pictures of them on an iPad until he finds the perfect one and then asks an adult to make an exact replica. When the adult cannot make the perfect windmill, screaming, crying and throwing of objects ensues. It can be very difficult to calm him down or distract him. This to me, is an obsession. This child is high-functioning but I don't believe these behaviours are just part of a personality type. As this child leaves the Early Years (he is currently five) he will need a diagnosis and one to one support going forward.
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  #95  
Old 16th February 2019, 19:48
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

This is the levels according to the dsm 5. I'm not sure whether the ICD has levels.

https://autism.lovetoknow.com/Differ...vels_of_Autism
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  #96  
Old 16th February 2019, 20:48
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^^ I think I agree with your viewpoint there Indigo_. Just because people with Autism are counted as high functioning doesn't mean that they don't need a lot of ongoing one to one support. My Mum has been a one to one support assistant for a number of teenagers who would fit that description, they might be continent, able to do things for themselves and able to communicate but they have some quite profound problems with social interactions and some have been considered vulnerable enough that they needed support at all times, including break times.
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  #97  
Old 16th February 2019, 21:09
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Some comments from my sister.


Quote:
He eventually met his wife, Brenda at one of the units and from that point he seemed to stabilise more and more. Brenda ran the household, cooked and cleaned and dealt with bills etc. This is not something Tim has ever been able to do without strong outside support.


Quote:
As an adult by this point Tim was much calmer but frankly could not function without Brenda to organise his life. He always had (and still does) anxiety and panic attacks about going out in public on his own. He could not cook or clean, finding tasks like that confusing even though very straightforward

Quote:
I truly think he finds it impossible to multi task, and can get very frustrated when things don't work or pan out
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  #98  
Old 19th February 2019, 17:36
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread


A talk about Autism in women and girls by an Autistic woman.
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  #99  
Old 26th February 2019, 10:50
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Second assessment.

Boy, was that hard. It***8217;s difficult answering whether you do x or y or not when it***8217;s just the way you are . That was why it was a good thing that my stepdaughter was there to say ***8220;Well actually***8230;***8221; or words to that effect.

Ironically I***8217;m not sure the assessor was good at picking up on facial expressions. She said I looked happy when actually I wasn***8217;t feeling either particularly happy or sad. My stepdaughter said that was just my normal face and I***8217;m really only animated when angry or stressed.



It was also difficult to tell if she was taking on board what I***8217;d actually said or was filtering things through her interpretation of what I***8217;d said . Appointment should have been 2 hours but was only an hour. That of course has got me second guessing as to why? Is it because they***8217;re coming to the conclusion I***8217;m not on the spectrum? If so why the need for a 3rd appointment?
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  #100  
Old 4th March 2019, 13:09
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Autistic people angry at having to disclose diagnosis to DVLA even if driving not affected


The National Autistic Society (NAS) is challenging a decision by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) to force autistic people to inform them of their diagnosis even if it does not affect their driving.

The surprise change in policy ***8211; which was not communicated to any autistic people, charities or medical professionals ***8211; emerged after a person with autism contacted the NAS and told them the DVLA website said drivers must disclose if they have an autistic spectrum disorder.


https://www.theguardian.com/society/...g-not-affected


And yet you don't have to inform the DVLA if you have dyspraxia which I think would result in poorer driving skills.

https://www.gov.uk/learning-difficulties-and-driving

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring...dyspraxia.html
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  #101  
Old 4th March 2019, 13:29
gregarious_introvert gregarious_introvert is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I'm going to pretend that I haven't read this, as I have no intention of disclosing my diagnosis to the DVLA; I've never seen this on the website (although I haven"t looked at the notifiable conditions for some time).

Learning to drive actually helped me deal with my dyspraxia by improving my coordination.

Sent from my SM-J330FN using Tapatalk
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  #102  
Old 5th March 2019, 11:24
Melangell Melangell is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Do you think it would affect your insurance if you don't declare it? Something else for me to worry about
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  #103  
Old 5th March 2019, 13:33
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

https://www.gov.uk/asd-and-driving It's now saying you only have to tell if it affects your driving.
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  #104  
Old 5th March 2019, 14:09
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ Yes the impression I get is you only need to declare it if it could have an effect on your driving, which obviously if someone has passed their test and has been driving for years without problems that's not the case!
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  #105  
Old 5th March 2019, 15:27
Melangell Melangell is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Yes, just read the same on Facebook, they've changed the wording back so that you only have to declare it if affects your driving.
The DVLA have also apparently apologised for 'muddying the waters'
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  #106  
Old 13th March 2019, 11:53
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Had the third assessment today . It was difficult remembering whether I had the various traits in early childhood . My stepdaughter inputted with things she'd noted that I had just seen as being 'Well that's just me! . For example rocking and tapping my feet . Due to the lack of childhood info the assessor has made me an appointment to do the ADOS. She will go over the information already provided and may or may not make a decision based on that. In which case I won't need to do the ADOS

She also said that signs of dyspraxia and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia clouded things to some degree .
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