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  #61  
Old 13th February 2019, 07:17
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Thanks everyone.
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  #62  
Old 13th February 2019, 13:07
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Was a little nerve wracking. A lot of stuff about very early childhood that I couldn't answer. I said 'maybe' to some stuff ie I wasn't sure. I was getting the impression,rightly or wrongly, she was taking those as a 'yes' . I struggled to answer what I did in my spare time at home and at boarding school. Mind was a virtual blank. Have got another appt on 27th this month and 13th next month. I'm not sure if that's par for the course, or if they're sure you're not on the spectrum they tell you straight out and there's no need for other appointments.

Got a Ritvo to do with some questions to fill in . One part was about other diagnoses including psychiatric ones. That's got me flustered as they want doctor's/clinic name. It seemed very ambivalent to me ie are they asking for current dx or dx back when first dxed in 1975?
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  #63  
Old 14th February 2019, 10:17
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I have to fill in the RAADs for my assessment but am stumped on the questions re normal rhythm/normal tone/unusual voice.


How does my voice sound here?




https://vocaroo.com/i/s1QcNTBTpdlJ
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  #64  
Old 14th February 2019, 12:00
Consolida Consolida is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ You have a lovely voice Firemonkey, NOT unusual at all. You sound very well spoken (which is good!), speak very clearly, and sound much more confident than I would have imagined considering you suffer with anxiety. I also thought that you put a lot of feeling into the piece you were reading, certainly not monotone in your deliverance.

Don't know if that helps at all
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  #65  
Old 14th February 2019, 12:47
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

It seems opinions vary as to how it is.

For example from other forums-

Quote:
There***8217;s an uneven rhythm to your speech, there isn***8217;t an even flow. There***8217;s also a higher pitch than usual for a man, a somewhat childlike quality to the tone of your voice.

Quote:
Sounds slightly sing-songy and there***8217;s a slightly unnatural sounding cadence to it,
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  #66  
Old 14th February 2019, 16:21
Consolida Consolida is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ Are these comments from people on other mental heath forums?

I'm flummoxed by some of their descriptions, tbh.
Higher pitch than usual for a man? What the heck are they talking about! Some men have deep voices, some have high pitched voices but yours sounds somewhere in between. It's an average sounding man's voice!

The sing songy comment perhaps is a different way of saying what I said about you having put some expression and feeling into your reading. That's surely better than something that comes across as boring and monotone?

When you ask people for their opinions on such things they are always going to give conflicting opinions. Pick out the comments that you like and discard the ones that you don't Firemonkey.

I bet most of them wouldn't have had the courage to record their voice on a public forum. I think you've done really well

Also, don't forget how you sound on the recording won't be exactly how you sound in real life, plus I imagine when you feel that you are 'putting on a performance' your voice may be affected by nerves although I wasn't aware of that.
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  #67  
Old 14th February 2019, 22:03
choirgirl choirgirl is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

You sound like you're reading something on the radio! Perhaps that is what the other comments mean? I don't think there is anything odd about it.
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  #68  
Old 15th February 2019, 10:47
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Change
You sound well spoken and intelligent.
I sounded a lot posher when I was younger. I think I'm more Estuary than Received pronunciation now .
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  #69  
Old 15th February 2019, 14:54
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I don't find the questions about speech patterns offensive , but how are you supposed to know whether your own speech patterns are different/unusual? Hence the need to ask other people. The trouble being there's a diverse range of opinions and it's hard to judge who's actually saying it is as it is and who's being diplomatic.
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  #70  
Old 15th February 2019, 15:05
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I agree it seems to not make any sense. Unless of course the people doing the test who claim to be neurotypical are more likely to have very mild ASD symptoms.
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  #71  
Old 15th February 2019, 16:00
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melangell
I really think there needs to be some reform in the diagnostic techniques for autism. I find the question about speech patterns offensive to be honest. It seems so clumsy and inappropriate. I've worked with lots of autistic children, many are non verbal, and of the ones with speech it varies just as much as with anyone else.

I really don't think there's much understanding of autism yet, I can't see how such a huge variety of issues can be the same condition. To me there are so many people labelled as autistic and I think they've had that label given because there's something not quite right... But nothing else has been found. I can't see how a kid who is non verbal and incontinent is supposed to have the same condition as a kid who has excellent self care and verbal skills, but punches someone if they touch their lego?

Surely there's more than one condition going on?
I have heard of kids now being diagnosed with Sensory Processing disorder separately to Autism.
I think that there can be a lot of difference between people with Autism though because of the fact that it is a spectrum but there are basic factors/symptoms that are the same. Like stimming behaviours, difficulties with social cues, sensory sensitivities, melt downs, obsessive focus and need for routines etc.
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  #72  
Old 15th February 2019, 19:17
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melangell
I find the question about speech patterns offensive to be honest. It seems so clumsy and inappropriate. I've worked with lots of autistic children, many are non verbal, and of the ones with speech it varies just as much as with anyone else.
I think autistic children who are verbal can display unusual prosody. I don't know how common this is but it can be an indicator. I have known a number of autistic children who speak in very high-pitched voices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melangell
I can't see how a kid who is non verbal and incontinent is supposed to have the same condition as a kid who has excellent self care and verbal skills, but punches someone if they touch their lego?

Surely there's more than one condition going on?
Comorbidity is common I believe. As Dougella has said, some children with autism have a sensory processing disorder. The two examples you give though, could describe children at different ends of the spectrum. I have taught an autistic child who was non-verbal, loved climbing the furniture, drinking toilet water, etc and another with excellent language, very artistic, can make intricate models and give me explanations for just about anything. Both are autistic though, their autism affects them in different ways.
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  #73  
Old 15th February 2019, 19:50
Aleks Aleks is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougella
^ I wonder if the fact that they both have years of practice of being on YouTube might make a difference to how confident they appear. Also they can cut out any parts afterwards where they didn't know what to say, or made a mistake or whatever but we don't get to see any of that. I have to be honest though I don't think I could do it either!
I remember very well the Chris Packham documentary, where he discussed his Aspergers.

If you watch a programme with Chris Packham in it, you simply wouldn't know that he had Aspergers. But when I saw his documentary where he discussed his Aspergers, you could definitely tell he was affected by it.
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  #74  
Old 15th February 2019, 19:53
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^^ That is what I thought, one person could have Asperger's (which I know isn't necessarily a diagnosis anymore) and another could have severe autism and be non verbal but they are both on the autistic spectrum.
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  #75  
Old 15th February 2019, 20:05
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougella
^^ That is what I thought, one person could have Asperger's (which I know isn't necessarily a diagnosis anymore) and another could have severe autism and be non verbal but they are both on the autistic spectrum.
Yes, Asperger's is no longer separate and falls under ASD now. Two children at either end of the spectrum would be incredibly different.
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  #76  
Old 16th February 2019, 18:55
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I don't really think of autism as a medical condition, in the same way that epilepsy, for example, is a medical condition. Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition. I do agree that it can be difficult to diagnose and there are no solid causes as of yet. I think autism is more than a set of traits though, there is a triad of impairment and simply having a trait such as echolalia would not necessarily be indicative of autism. Echolalia can be linked to speech and language difficulties, which in turn could cause poor social skills.

Again, with obsessions, it's more than just an intense interest or hobby. A child in my class at the moment who is clearly autistic, absolutely loves windmills. All he wants to make are windmills. He will look at pictures of them on an iPad until he finds the perfect one and then asks an adult to make an exact replica. When the adult cannot make the perfect windmill, screaming, crying and throwing of objects ensues. It can be very difficult to calm him down or distract him. This to me, is an obsession. This child is high-functioning but I don't believe these behaviours are just part of a personality type. As this child leaves the Early Years (he is currently five) he will need a diagnosis and one to one support going forward.
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  #77  
Old 16th February 2019, 19:48
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

This is the levels according to the dsm 5. I'm not sure whether the ICD has levels.

https://autism.lovetoknow.com/Differ...vels_of_Autism
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  #78  
Old 16th February 2019, 20:48
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^^ I think I agree with your viewpoint there Indigo_. Just because people with Autism are counted as high functioning doesn't mean that they don't need a lot of ongoing one to one support. My Mum has been a one to one support assistant for a number of teenagers who would fit that description, they might be continent, able to do things for themselves and able to communicate but they have some quite profound problems with social interactions and some have been considered vulnerable enough that they needed support at all times, including break times.
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  #79  
Old 16th February 2019, 21:09
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Some comments from my sister.


Quote:
He eventually met his wife, Brenda at one of the units and from that point he seemed to stabilise more and more. Brenda ran the household, cooked and cleaned and dealt with bills etc. This is not something Tim has ever been able to do without strong outside support.


Quote:
As an adult by this point Tim was much calmer but frankly could not function without Brenda to organise his life. He always had (and still does) anxiety and panic attacks about going out in public on his own. He could not cook or clean, finding tasks like that confusing even though very straightforward

Quote:
I truly think he finds it impossible to multi task, and can get very frustrated when things don't work or pan out
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  #80  
Old 19th February 2019, 17:36
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread


A talk about Autism in women and girls by an Autistic woman.
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  #81  
Old 26th February 2019, 10:50
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Second assessment.

Boy, was that hard. It***8217;s difficult answering whether you do x or y or not when it***8217;s just the way you are . That was why it was a good thing that my stepdaughter was there to say ***8220;Well actually***8230;***8221; or words to that effect.

Ironically I***8217;m not sure the assessor was good at picking up on facial expressions. She said I looked happy when actually I wasn***8217;t feeling either particularly happy or sad. My stepdaughter said that was just my normal face and I***8217;m really only animated when angry or stressed.



It was also difficult to tell if she was taking on board what I***8217;d actually said or was filtering things through her interpretation of what I***8217;d said . Appointment should have been 2 hours but was only an hour. That of course has got me second guessing as to why? Is it because they***8217;re coming to the conclusion I***8217;m not on the spectrum? If so why the need for a 3rd appointment?
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  #82  
Old 4th March 2019, 13:09
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Autistic people angry at having to disclose diagnosis to DVLA even if driving not affected


The National Autistic Society (NAS) is challenging a decision by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) to force autistic people to inform them of their diagnosis even if it does not affect their driving.

The surprise change in policy ***8211; which was not communicated to any autistic people, charities or medical professionals ***8211; emerged after a person with autism contacted the NAS and told them the DVLA website said drivers must disclose if they have an autistic spectrum disorder.


https://www.theguardian.com/society/...g-not-affected


And yet you don't have to inform the DVLA if you have dyspraxia which I think would result in poorer driving skills.

https://www.gov.uk/learning-difficulties-and-driving

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring...dyspraxia.html
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  #83  
Old 4th March 2019, 13:29
gregarious_introvert gregarious_introvert is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I'm going to pretend that I haven't read this, as I have no intention of disclosing my diagnosis to the DVLA; I've never seen this on the website (although I haven"t looked at the notifiable conditions for some time).

Learning to drive actually helped me deal with my dyspraxia by improving my coordination.

Sent from my SM-J330FN using Tapatalk
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  #84  
Old 5th March 2019, 13:33
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

https://www.gov.uk/asd-and-driving It's now saying you only have to tell if it affects your driving.
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  #85  
Old 5th March 2019, 14:09
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ Yes the impression I get is you only need to declare it if it could have an effect on your driving, which obviously if someone has passed their test and has been driving for years without problems that's not the case!
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  #86  
Old 13th March 2019, 11:53
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Had the third assessment today . It was difficult remembering whether I had the various traits in early childhood . My stepdaughter inputted with things she'd noted that I had just seen as being 'Well that's just me! . For example rocking and tapping my feet . Due to the lack of childhood info the assessor has made me an appointment to do the ADOS. She will go over the information already provided and may or may not make a decision based on that. In which case I won't need to do the ADOS

She also said that signs of dyspraxia and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia clouded things to some degree .
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  #87  
Old 22nd March 2019, 21:04
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Ad watchdog orders homeopaths to stop claiming autism cure .


The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has ordered 150 UK homeopaths to stop claiming they can cure autism.

Five homeopaths are facing prosecution for advertising Cease ***8220;therapy***8221;, which is not supported by scientific evidence and can be harmful to children.



https://www.theguardian.com/society/...ng-autism-cure
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  #88  
Old 22nd March 2019, 21:12
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ Good!
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  #89  
Old 8th April 2019, 22:07
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I had an autism assessment a couple of month back and was found to be on the Asperger's spectrum. Was diagnosed as having ADHD about 6 years ago as well but, as was explained during my assessment, the ASD is subservient to the ADHD.
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  #90  
Old 10th April 2019, 07:56
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubbs
Particularly those living in the Hampshire area..? (Bit of a long shot, I know!) I've heard they want your parents to come to the interview to say what you were like as a child, is this true? Because I'd rather not involve my parents if poss.
They recommend you bring a parent as they might remember traits you had as a small child that could be very early signs of ASD. If your first word was a sentence, you began talking late or you were know for repetitive behavior for example.

It's not essential though, neither of mine were present.
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