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  #91  
Old 22nd March 2019, 21:04
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Ad watchdog orders homeopaths to stop claiming autism cure .


The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has ordered 150 UK homeopaths to stop claiming they can cure autism.

Five homeopaths are facing prosecution for advertising Cease ***8220;therapy***8221;, which is not supported by scientific evidence and can be harmful to children.



https://www.theguardian.com/society/...ng-autism-cure
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  #92  
Old 22nd March 2019, 21:12
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^ Good!
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  #93  
Old 8th April 2019, 22:07
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I had an autism assessment a couple of month back and was found to be on the Asperger's spectrum. Was diagnosed as having ADHD about 6 years ago as well but, as was explained during my assessment, the ASD is subservient to the ADHD.
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  #94  
Old 10th April 2019, 07:56
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubbs
Particularly those living in the Hampshire area..? (Bit of a long shot, I know!) I've heard they want your parents to come to the interview to say what you were like as a child, is this true? Because I'd rather not involve my parents if poss.
They recommend you bring a parent as they might remember traits you had as a small child that could be very early signs of ASD. If your first word was a sentence, you began talking late or you were know for repetitive behavior for example.

It's not essential though, neither of mine were present.
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  #95  
Old 12th May 2019, 17:38
mutedsoul mutedsoul is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

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  #96  
Old 13th May 2019, 07:27
mutedsoul mutedsoul is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I'm thinking of going to my GP's to ask about being referred for a diagnosis. I've been there a few times, once an old man refused to refer me. I went another time and actually saw a psychiatrist for an assessment and the psychiatrist said how I have too much eye contact to be autistic and how I would have been diagnosed at a younger age if I really was autistic. The other time I went was a year ago or something. The GP said that they would refer me but I haven't heard anything at all about being referred since then.

I don't feel satisfied with the assessments so far and feel like going to ask about being referred again and not feeling guilty again about asking for a diagnosis.

Mainly cause I've noticed I've never fitted in social places and am increasingly seen as weird. People treat me as if I'm dumb just cause I'm really shy. Although I give eye contact it seems like it's usually the wrong amount as it seems like others think that I stare at them. I am clueless with small talk and responding to most jokes. At my current job I find it hard and exhausting when I'm expected to multi task.

I also feel like I've been told I interact wrong throughout my life. My interactions mainly lead to misunderstandings. And yes I probably can do with learning to interact better but it's not my fault. I feel a diagnosis would somehow make me feel more understood and make me more accepting of myself.

I may not be autistic but I feel if I am not I probably have something else. I'm not satisfied with the depression diagnosis that the assessor gave me before as that feels like a symptom of being misunderstood throughout life, not having friends, being seen as odd etc. Who wouldn't feel depressed or at least frustrated about that.

I also feel that social anxiety is widely a symptom of whatever problem I have. If I knew how to respond to small talk and jokes and felt like I could understand people more I wouldn't be as anxious.

I'm tired of pretending this isn't a big deal. I feel like acting as if my life has been typical and ignoring problems has also limited me in my career to do a kitchen porter, a job I dislike and sometimes find depressing.
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  #97  
Old 13th May 2019, 07:47
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutedsoul
I went another time and actually saw a psychiatrist for an assessment and the psychiatrist said how I have too much eye contact to be autistic and how I would have been diagnosed at a younger age if I really was autistic.
I think this is rubbish. Lots of people are diagnosed later in life.
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  #98  
Old 13th May 2019, 08:46
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

It's taken me years to get someone to accept there might be more going on than just a mental illness. When it was accepted the time between a referral being made and my first assessment was just under 4 months .
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  #99  
Old 13th May 2019, 09:23
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melangell
That was one of the reasons for my diagnosis, that I am constantly trying to figure out how to interact, instead of instinctively knowing how to.

It's never come easily to me. The whole body language/non-verbal cues thing is something that I struggle to grasp.
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  #100  
Old 13th May 2019, 10:45
mutedsoul mutedsoul is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indigo_
I think this is rubbish. Lots of people are diagnosed later in life.
Exactly, I think maybe my local NHS have outdated views on autism. I think autism used to be seen as an easily noticeable condition and high functioning autism wasn't recognised. Idk, but it's like how they are finding that girls present autism differently to the stereotypical autism.

I may not have autism but definitely some kind of neurological disorders or difference.
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  #101  
Old 13th May 2019, 12:27
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutedsoul

I may not have autism but definitely some kind of neurological disorders or difference.


That strikes a chord with me. Unfortunately if you have a severe mental illness many mental health professionals very much tend to see things through the lens of that diagnosis. They're not good at looking beyond that.
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  #102  
Old 13th May 2019, 15:38
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutedsoul
I'm thinking of going to my GP's to ask about being referred for a diagnosis. I've been there a few times, once an old man refused to refer me. I went another time and actually saw a psychiatrist for an assessment and the psychiatrist said how I have too much eye contact to be autistic and how I would have been diagnosed at a younger age if I really was autistic. The other time I went was a year ago or something. The GP said that they would refer me but I haven't heard anything at all about being referred since then.

I don't feel satisfied with the assessments so far and feel like going to ask about being referred again and not feeling guilty again about asking for a diagnosis.

Mainly cause I've noticed I've never fitted in social places and am increasingly seen as weird. People treat me as if I'm dumb just cause I'm really shy. Although I give eye contact it seems like it's usually the wrong amount as it seems like others think that I stare at them. I am clueless with small talk and responding to most jokes. At my current job I find it hard and exhausting when I'm expected to multi task.

I also feel like I've been told I interact wrong throughout my life. My interactions mainly lead to misunderstandings. And yes I probably can do with learning to interact better but it's not my fault. I feel a diagnosis would somehow make me feel more understood and make me more accepting of myself.

I may not be autistic but I feel if I am not I probably have something else. I'm not satisfied with the depression diagnosis that the assessor gave me before as that feels like a symptom of being misunderstood throughout life, not having friends, being seen as odd etc. Who wouldn't feel depressed or at least frustrated about that.

I also feel that social anxiety is widely a symptom of whatever problem I have. If I knew how to respond to small talk and jokes and felt like I could understand people more I wouldn't be as anxious.

I'm tired of pretending this isn't a big deal. I feel like acting as if my life has been typical and ignoring problems has also limited me in my career to do a kitchen porter, a job I dislike and sometimes find depressing.
Have you considered contacting The National Autistic Society? They can help point you in the right direction and give you advise on how to go about getting a proper diagnosis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melangell
I was diagnosed in my 30s and can make eye contact. I have worked with lots of autistic people who have a huge range of traits, not making eye contact can be one, but lots of people who have autism do make eye contact. It is irritating that some people think they know what autism is by knowing a few traits, usually things like lining things up, or liking trains!

I am in absolutely no way qualified to have an opinion on any conditions you might have, muted soul, but I know from your posts that the sheer effort it takes you to socialise daily and the confusion you often feel strike a chord. That was one of the reasons for my diagnosis, that I am constantly trying to figure out how to interact, instead of instinctively knowing how to.
Exactly. I'd hazard a guess that the psychiatrist MutedSoul saw probably wasn't an autism specialist. Being a psychiatrist doesn't automatically qualify someone to know for certain if that person has autism. That's why the mental health team psychiatrist sent me for a proper assessment rather than try to diagnose me himself.

As for eye contact. Actually some of the time my eye contact can be very good. Other times it waxes and wanes. I think over the years I've learnt better eye contact skills.

Quote:
Originally Posted by firemonkey
It's never come easily to me. The whole body language/non-verbal cues thing is something that I struggle to grasp.
It took me a while to get the hang of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutedsoul
Exactly, I think maybe my local NHS have outdated views on autism. I think autism used to be seen as an easily noticeable condition and high functioning autism wasn't recognised. Idk, but it's like how they are finding that girls present autism differently to the stereotypical autism.

I may not have autism but definitely some kind of neurological disorders or difference.
Fortunately that's gradually changing. Mental health services are learning lessons. They're also learning that autism can be displayed in different ways by different people, it doesn't present itself in an exacting manner.
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  #103  
Old 13th May 2019, 15:47
mutedsoul mutedsoul is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Percy
Have you considered contacting The National Autistic Society? They can help point you in the right direction and give you advise on how to go about getting a proper diagnosis.

I'll see about that. I've been reading about getting diagnosed in their website.
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  #104  
Old 15th May 2019, 22:22
In_infamy In_infamy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Hi all,

I got a referral from my GP for an assessment. Any advice or insight into how assessment went would be appreciated. In particular, I'm keen to know if you always must bring someone to provide evidence? I don't like the idea of telling anyone about it and certainly not getting them to come along and provide evidence.
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  #105  
Old 15th May 2019, 22:33
gregarious_introvert gregarious_introvert is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^Mine was pretty painless and took about four or five hours - I was told it would last the whole day. I didn't have anyone who could provide evidence, as there is nobody in my life who knew me in childhood, but I had pretty good recollection myself.
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  #106  
Old 16th May 2019, 01:27
Percy Percy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by In_infamy
Hi all,

I got a referral from my GP for an assessment. Any advice or insight into how assessment went would be appreciated. In particular, I'm keen to know if you always must bring someone to provide evidence? I don't like the idea of telling anyone about it and certainly not getting them to come along and provide evidence.
You don't have to but it does help if someone who knew you from childhood comes along to clarify any old childhood habits that might be autistic traits.
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  #107  
Old 16th May 2019, 02:40
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Quote:
Finally, during the study a new diagnostic interview will be developed and piloted for use to identify ASCs in adults in situations when there is little or no early developmental history available.
https://research.ncl.ac.uk/neurodisa...orascinadults/


I wonder how things are progressing with this.
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  #108  
Old 20th May 2019, 10:50
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Just got the assessment report.

The conclusion- I do fit the criteria for Asperger syndrome in terms of the criteria set out in the ICD 10.
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  #109  
Old 20th May 2019, 10:55
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Just got the assessment report.

The conclusion- I do fit the criteria for Asperger syndrome in terms of the criteria set out in the ICD 10.
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  #110  
Old 20th May 2019, 12:39
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I'm feeling good about it. It confirms what I've long suspected ie that there's more going on than just mental illness.

They've offered a one off post diagnosis session in which helpful approaches will be discussed and signposting to supportive services
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  #111  
Old 20th May 2019, 16:42
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

^^ I'm not sure if congratulations is the right word to use, but I'm glad you got some answers from your assessment I hope that the diagnosis will be some help for you to get support in the future, or just for you to understand yourself better.
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  #112  
Old 28th May 2019, 14:45
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

https://www.spectrumnews.org/opinion...rious-concern/

I was the opposite with signs of severe mental illness since I was 18 ,with it not being established I was on the spectrum till I was 62. Either way there needs to be a more intelligent approach to the issue.
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  #113  
Old 30th May 2019, 21:28
Kooky Monster Kooky Monster is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I've been starting to wonder recently if this could apply to me, so I ran the idea past the lady I see at the mental health charity I attend (she's a former nurse and not a MH worker), and while after reading up on it she agreed that I could fit the critera, the main question she asked me was 'what difference would it make now, at this stage in life, if you were to receive a diagnosis?' and I was a bit stumped as to how to answer it.

So to those of you who have been dianosed later in life, or are looking for a diagnosis - what difference did/do you think receiving one made/would make to you?
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  #114  
Old 30th May 2019, 21:46
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

For me it was about fitting together the pieces to a puzzle, and validating what I'd known for years(ie that there was more going on than severe mental illness) . At 62 , and with the scant help and support for adults on the spectrum , I'm not expecting any earth shattering difference.

It will however strengthen the need to maintain the current level of social care I get .
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  #115  
Old 1st June 2019, 15:43
Kooky Monster Kooky Monster is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Thanks for your reply, firemonkey
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  #116  
Old 4th June 2019, 18:15
In_infamy In_infamy is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I've just found out the waiting list for a first appointment is 12 - 18 months. Extremely unhelpful. How long did other people have to wait?
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  #117  
Old 4th June 2019, 19:24
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

From referral letter to confirmation of diagnosis was just under 7 months for me .
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  #118  
Old 5th June 2019, 20:04
Mr. Nobody Mr. Nobody is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

Anyone feel that being on the autism spectrum has robbed you of your humanity?

Dealing with, or relating with, people seems like living in a foreign country where you don't know the language and you've resorted to filing behaviour, etiquette and social interaction under a kind of binary code system or a database.
She has done this, therefore I should ask that,
He has said this, so now I must respond with that,
The whole thing becomes a guessing game of trying to find the correct responses that should work in the situation,
But it's all so remote and feels like I'm in the dark, desperately trying not to do wrong, but invariably getting it wrong and appearing insincere
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  #119  
Old 6th June 2019, 10:22
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread

I make little attempt of my own bat to interact with people. From as far back as I can remember I've been the same. If I have to socialise I'll be as polite/sociable as I can, there's no intent to deliberately upset anyone, but as my stepdaughter said I do things that people might see as inappropriate and talk across people(whatever that means).

Every now and then I'll make an attempt to socialise . Last time was several months ago . I went to a mental health group at my local library. I didn't initiate any conversation, but offered the occasional response to other people's comments. It fell on deaf ears . I felt like an outsider. The situation was made worse when I gave some money for the coffee and tea fund , and the person running the group made a sarky comment about my having my money on a piece of string. Needless to say I never went back.

That's been par for the course with other attempts to socialise, ie a total failure to integrate.
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  #120  
Old 11th June 2019, 01:08
mutedsoul mutedsoul is offline
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Default Re: The Autism, Asperger's and ASD Thread



This video actually relaxed me a bit. I think it was the fact that the guy seemed accepting of the fact that he had aspergers.

My temp job has finished since they found someone permanent, though he is on a trial. I actually asked to be permanent but then changed my mind as the environment was depressing for me.

It feels refreshing being unemployed, it's like I have more energy and freedom to do what I want. But it's also scary and shameful. Like I can't even hold down as minimum wage job. Maybe it's immature of me to not take responsibility and work.

Tbh though, I think ideally what I need is to actually go to the doctors to sort out my depression, anxiety and also get a diagnosis. May actually be another neurological disorder to autism. I think a neurological disorders is the root of my anxiety which causes me depression. I need help more than employment.

I do want a job but for a job to be sustainable it needs to be in an environment where at least I feel supported or treated like an equal. I actually don't feel it would be a bad idea to go on benefits now, though I wouldn't want to, cause I imagine doing another job the same old, depressing situation repeating itself. No friends, being misunderstood having some people even give you dirty look, silent treatment etc.

Probably mainly need support or top be more comfortable with myself. I just realised how I don't feel that I have anyone in real life that I can talk about my issues to. Maybe my one WhatsApp friend. But my mum has her own mental illness and is also socially awkward.
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