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  #31  
Old 24th May 2019, 14:08
Jimmy77 Jimmy77 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thaifoodparadise
I know people change over time, and there's a good chance those extroverted stages were just anomalies in my quiet, withdrawn, life. But they confirm what I've always believed; that extroverted people are generally happier and have way more fun in life. I wish I could be grateful that I at least experienced some happiness, but I spend half of my life longing for the nostalgia of those days; the being in love with a girl who I thought I'd be with forever, having friends I could laugh and joke with. I don't believe I'll experience such happiness again. Sigh.
It's a big question - whether extroverts are happier than introverts. Like you, I suspect the extroverts are happier. Being an extrovert means you meet more people, which gives you more chance to form a group of people whose company you really enjoy. When you are an introvert, meeting new people is stressful and exhausting. You have a smaller pool of people to choose from and less chance of making those deep, lasting connections. Instead, introverts probably make do with a handful of friends, often people with whom they have little in common.

Truth is I bitterly resent being this way. I hate being so introverted. And it's clearly a genetic thing (Professor Robert Plomin, a leading expert on genetics, thinks introversion is largely inherited). We're just so ****ing helpless in life. We have no say over where we're born, our physical appearance, or much of our personality. For example, I remember a friend at college who was just so confident, so extrovert. He had more confidence in his little finger than I've ever had in my whole body. It was like he was on cocaine 24/7. I guess there are a few upsides to introversion, but extreme introversion is a curse that makes life much, much harder.
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  #32  
Old 24th May 2019, 17:50
Indigo_ Indigo_ is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

^ I think it depends on how you want to be. If you're an introvert who wants to be an extrovert then yes, you're unlikely to be happy. I'm happy being an introvert. I can't think of anything worse than socialising with others on a regular basis. I have no desire to have friends, any friends, at all and outside of work I'm happy to spend the majority of my time sitting on the sofa gaming.
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  #33  
Old 24th May 2019, 17:59
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thaifoodparadise
I don't even know if most of my behavior is influenced by introversion or social anxiety. I have long hidden under the veil of introversion but the happiest years of my life were when I was 12 and 18, both of which were abnormally outgoing times for me.

My school report from when I was 12 reads, "Thaifoodparadise is an extremely bright student who is popular among all his classmates." When I was 18, I had a group of 5 friends and a very good looking girlfriend who was out of my league.

I remember crying a lot when I was 12 and I was coming towards the end of primary school like I had some intuitive understanding that this was the pinnacle of my life; the happiest things would ever get. I remember the bell ringing on the final day and everyone practically skipped out of school. I joined in to act like I was happy but I felt incredibly sad inside knowing this period of my life was ending.

When I left secondary school at 18, I also knew that it was the end of a really happy time in my life. I struggled badly at uni to meet people and make friends; what didn't help was being on a campus full of thousands of people and seeing everyone socialize so easily. The low self-esteem from hating uni then affected my relationship with the aforementioned girl. She eventually dumped me after 3 years together by text message. That was 7 years ago now and it still stings to this day. I reacted poorly to being dumped by such an impersonal means and I sent her a barrage of abusive messages to the point that her parents called me and warned me to stop. Neither of us will ever speak to each other again, yet she crosses my mind at least once every day.

I know people change over time, and there's a good chance those extroverted stages were just anomalies in my quiet, withdrawn, life. But they confirm what I've always believed; that extroverted people are generally happier and have way more fun in life. I wish I could be grateful that I at least experienced some happiness, but I spend half of my life longing for the nostalgia of those days; the being in love with a girl who I thought I'd be with forever, having friends I could laugh and joke with. I don't believe I'll experience such happiness again. Sigh.
I think that the fact that you had those happy times in your life and the happiness was linked to the people you had relationships with at the time just shows what you are capable of. Extroverted people aren't necessarily loud or hugely outgoing but they enjoy being around people a lot and feel energised by spending time with people, as I understand it. Whereas introverts prefer more time to themselves (although that doesn't mean that they don't enjoy close friendships and relationships too.)

I think that you could certainly experience those things again, particularly having another relationship if you want to.
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  #34  
Old 24th May 2019, 18:03
limey123 limey123 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

I feel sorry for extroverts, being largely dependent, as they are, on other people for their happiness.

I wonder, too, whether because they are less introspective, they are slower to reach nirvana (in the Jain sense of the word). But most likely we have many extrovert lives as well as introvert ones, it being a mere personality trait.
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  #35  
Old 24th May 2019, 20:00
Raven. Raven. is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Being on my own most of the time allows me to appreciate things more without people yakking in my ear and distracting me. It annoys me when I'm out hiking with a more extroverted person and they're just chatting shite along the way rather than experiencing the moment.
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  #36  
Old 24th May 2019, 20:49
limey123 limey123 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven.
It annoys me when I'm out hiking with a more extroverted person and they're just chatting shite along the way rather than experiencing the moment.

Great point. You're experiencing a serene, sublime moment in your life and some other bugger's just babbling on in the background totally oblivious or indifferent to your rapture.

Sometimes extroverts drive me nuts (apologies to those of you out there . I was in an office the other day for a couple of hours and there was some geezer in the adjoining office babbling incessantly and loudly on the phone. So the entire room had no choice but to hear his convo. Even next door I could hear every word. He did this pretty much the whole time I was there. No way I could work in that office, because it's clear he would never shut the hell up!
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  #37  
Old 24th May 2019, 21:33
Utopia Utopia is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Well to be honest, I don't think it's completely determined by genes, I know that I felt bad about the person I was as a teenager and did want acceptance, and in doing that I became more extroverted in some ways, but I do still have introverted and autistic traits that are genetic. Nowadays, I am more accepting of the way I am, but I realise it's considered less normal.

I have sent off my genes to 23andme and found that I actuallh have genes that significantly increase the chance of autism, this is very much a genetic condition, and when it's high functioning, it's less clear to others that you can't help the way you are.

You can be an introvert without having SA, I am generally ok with being around others now, but I might be quiet or in my own head a lot of the time.
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  #38  
Old 24th May 2019, 23:17
Dimplesxo Dimplesxo is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

^ I can really relate to this. I would love to have friends but I'm so socially inept that I can't even talk to people or put myself in a situation to meet people.
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  #39  
Old 25th May 2019, 11:29
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by limey123
I feel sorry for extroverts, being largely dependent, as they are, on other people for their happiness.
One thing I do find strange is how guilty we often feel for being introverts. Why do I feel ashamed of it? Why am I ashamed of the fact that I can walk along the beach on my own, or browse though a bookshop, and be perfectly happy? I suspect it's because the extroverts need people. And they resent introverts for not needing them. Introverts literally scare them. After all, if the majority of us were introverts, the extroverts would go crazy. And because introverts scare them, they tend to ridicule and attack them (and being extroverts, they shout much louder and command more attention).

I was listening to a podcast on loneliness the other night. Someone made a very good point, one I hadn't considered before. They said that, though loneliness is very common, most won't admit to it. And they won't admit to it because it's shameful. I guess that goes back to school/adolescence. Remember the way kids used to say things like "haha...no mates", etc? How they used to ridicule and tease anyone who seemed to have no friends? It can take a long time to shake off those adolescent fears and insecurities. You get in this defensive habit, pretending to have more friends, more fun, more sex etc than you really are. When you then become an adult, it can be hard break that habit and admit "you know what, I'm lonely." Or "you know what, I don't have any friends - and I don't really want any."

How many people on here don't want any friends? Personally, I would like a handful of good friends - people I could chat to about books, etc. But I certainly don't want a wide circle of casual friends, or to get to know my neighbors better (I can't stand most of them).
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  #40  
Old 25th May 2019, 12:36
lone*star lone*star is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moksha
How many people on here don't want any friends?
I suspect there's a strong (but subtle and little recognized) link between 'being a person' and 'wanting friends'. So yes, of course a person wants friends. A person needs friends! A person is the very separation of humanity into tiny individual fragments; each looking to regain the original wholeness that has been lost in the process of becoming separate!

If we manage to survive long enough as a race (which seems unlikely) future generations will look back in history at us, living now, and laugh to themselves: "People actually thought that they were separate entities; in competition with each other; all fighting their own little corner in life. They didn't realise that they had to work together, both with themselves and with nature as a whole, in order to succeed."
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  #41  
Old 25th May 2019, 14:50
limey123 limey123 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lone*star
A person is the very separation of humanity into tiny individual fragments; each looking to regain the original wholeness that has been lost in the process of becoming separate!

I agree entirely. I believe that ultimately we are all part of a single entity, and our ultimate destiny and impetus is to arrive back at that one-ness.

If only more of our great religions had been about our collective soul rather than the concept of individual salvation. I really like your idea of working together, lone*star.
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  #42  
Old 25th May 2019, 15:02
Jimmy77 Jimmy77 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lone*star
I suspect there's a strong (but subtle and little recognized) link between 'being a person' and 'wanting friends'. So yes, of course a person wants friends. A person needs friends!
I always feel I should want friends more than I do. Sometimes, I wonder if I'm lying to myself when I say I don't really want any. Or maybe I've just got so used to being on my own? The honest truth is I never craved company, even when I was a child.
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  #43  
Old 25th May 2019, 20:40
lone*star lone*star is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

^ Maybe you're not limited to being merely a person?

I also have very little interest in other people socially, but then I don't take myself to be a person only. You see, the interesting thing about being a person, is that it is ultimately your choice! Most people think that you're simply born into being a person, and that's that. But being a person is actually a limitation of consciousness - and you don't have to remain bound within that limitation if you don't wish to. What you are ultimately is totally free, unbound and without limitation - which means it can be what ever it wants - or not be anything at all! Being a person has its good points, but I don't think I'd want to be stuck as one permanently.
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  #44  
Old 25th May 2019, 22:54
choirgirl choirgirl is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

My problem is I find other people annoying. Sooner or later. Unless I can socialise in a controlled way - like online, or in a situation where I can go home when I want. That's why I've been obsessed with getting my own place for 20 years.
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  #45  
Old 25th May 2019, 23:35
Raven. Raven. is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by choirgirl
...Unless I can socialise in a controlled way - like online, or in a situation where I can go home when I want.
I can relate to this.
When I had my dogs, I used them as my 'get out' clause. I would leave a social situation that was getting a wee bit too much with the phrase " sorry, got to go and let my dogs out".
Given that everyone now knows my dogs have died, using that excuse has much less impact! I think I'll have to get another dog soon just to get me out of staff nights out.
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  #46  
Old 26th May 2019, 17:14
Jude99 Jude99 is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

As Mary J. Blige sang... No Drama. Extroverts are always full of drama, always something going on. They get depressed if they are left alone. Being an introvert, you don't have to put up with any of that also, introverts tend to be rational thinkers. Where would the world be without us.
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  #47  
Old 29th May 2019, 21:16
Laurel Laurel is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

https://www.quietrev.com/my-father-t...campaign=qr+tw
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  #48  
Old 29th May 2019, 23:17
hollowone hollowone is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

There's a lot of confusion about introvert & shy/socially-anxious.

Introvert describes a preference for fewer but deeper friendships, but not minding no social contact when you have that. Extroverted generally means a greater preference for social contact.

There are shy and socially-anxious introverts, there are shy/socially-anxious extroverts. There are confident extroverts, there are confident introverts. People often use the word 'introvert' as a synonym for 'shy'.

I see some of the discussion lately has been along the lines of 'is there something wrong with me because I don't want friends as much as others'. It's OK not to want tons of friends, one or two good ones is what some people are perfectly happy with, that's totally normal and fine. It's important to differentiate natural PREFERENCES from social hindrances like shyness & social anxiety.

Anyway, as for the OP, there are upsides to being shy & having struggled with SA, in that if you've experienced it, when you do become more confident you'll be able to leak little bits of empathy and maybe even more positive than the average person.
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  #49  
Old 29th May 2019, 23:27
hollowone hollowone is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Helloa

RE
Quote:
It annoys me when I'm out hiking with a more extroverted person and they're just chatting shite along the way rather than experiencing the moment.

Totally get that, I know those sorts of people who feel they need to talk constantly, to a degree I've been a bit like that. You can read the assumption 'if I'm quiet they'll think I'm weird' erm, not at all, maybe if you keep talking when people want their space that might not work in your favour.

People often feel they have to come across as 'extraverted', 'talkative' and 'interesting' because they've absorbed the message that being 'quiet' is 'bad'. I'm sure we've all had moments where we've felt 'yikes, I'm being quiet, not saying anything, they'll think I'm boring'.

As for what has been said, the caring about what people think note has come up. It's definitely true, that the more we learn not to care, the less scared we feel about being judged negatively. The 'what' bit (they'll think I'm weird), and the 'why' bit; what it means to me. This is a really important point.
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  #50  
Old 30th May 2019, 14:28
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

I have a friend who is a pure, textbook extrovert. Tuesday evening he phoned and asked if I wanted to go for a coffee. He now works from home and is going crazy from the isolation. So I picked him up about 7:00pm and we went to McDonalds. He didn't want anything in particular, and hadn't much news, he just craved company. When he is near other people, he seems to gain energy and come alive. Being around people is like plugging him into the mains. Anyway, he showed me some photos of him on a stag do with about 20 other guys, all grinning and laddish, who had booked a weekend in Prague. Then he was telling me about some big get together with his wife's family. What really struck me, as it always does, is how much easier life is when you're an extrovert. Of course, he is also incredibly confident and assertive, which helps (presumably you can have a shy, insecure extrovert ). He never agonizes over what happened, over the stupid things he said or the awkward silences. Neither does he worry whether the people there liked him. And instead of dreading such things for weeks in advance (as I would) he barely thinks about them at all.

But it isn't just his extroverted nature that amazes me. We are polar opposites in so many ways: he's an extrovert, I'm an introvert; he likes everyone he meets and barely distinguishes one person from another (I swear he'd have liked Jimmy Saville), I'm hyper- sensitive to different personalities, never miss a thing, and dislike more people than I like; he is high-energy and happy, I'm low energy and melancholic; he is optimistic and looks for things to be excited about, I'm pessimistic to the point of paranoia. I can think of several people who have ZERO self-awareness and absolutely ZERO social anxiety. They astonish me, not because they are chatty and confident but because they are just so ****ing comfortable and relaxed when around others. In fact, these differences between people have amazed me all my life; some are so different it's like comparing a giraffe to a crocodile. And I don't care what anyone says, those differences lie in the genes.
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  #51  
Old 30th May 2019, 16:03
Pub Jo Pub Jo is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Rare invites to parties talking aimless sh#t to people you really dont know
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  #52  
Old 2nd June 2019, 15:38
Genetically_Inferior Genetically_Inferior is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moksha
I have a friend who is a pure, textbook extrovert. Tuesday evening he phoned and asked if I wanted to go for a coffee. He now works from home and is going crazy from the isolation. So I picked him up about 7:00pm and we went to McDonalds. He didn't want anything in particular, and hadn't much news, he just craved company. When he is near other people, he seems to gain energy and come alive. Being around people is like plugging him into the mains. Anyway, he showed me some photos of him on a stag do with about 20 other guys, all grinning and laddish, who had booked a weekend in Prague. Then he was telling me about some big get together with his wife's family. What really struck me, as it always does, is how much easier life is when you're an extrovert. Of course, he is also incredibly confident and assertive, which helps (presumably you can have a shy, insecure extrovert ). He never agonizes over what happened, over the stupid things he said or the awkward silences. Neither does he worry whether the people there liked him. And instead of dreading such things for weeks in advance (as I would) he barely thinks about them at all.

But it isn't just his extroverted nature that amazes me. We are polar opposites in so many ways: he's an extrovert, I'm an introvert; he likes everyone he meets and barely distinguishes one person from another (I swear he'd have liked Jimmy Saville), I'm hyper- sensitive to different personalities, never miss a thing, and dislike more people than I like; he is high-energy and happy, I'm low energy and melancholic; he is optimistic and looks for things to be excited about, I'm pessimistic to the point of paranoia. I can think of several people who have ZERO self-awareness and absolutely ZERO social anxiety. They astonish me, not because they are chatty and confident but because they are just so ****ing comfortable and relaxed when around others. In fact, these differences between people have amazed me all my life; some are so different it's like comparing a giraffe to a crocodile. And I don't care what anyone says, those differences lie in the genes.
It's all genetics plus very early childhood experiences in the age range from 3 to 6 years.
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  #53  
Old 2nd June 2019, 17:32
Moksha Moksha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Genetically_Inferior
It's all genetics plus very early childhood experiences in the age range from 3 to 6 years.
Yeah, that's the conclusion I've come to as well. You don't inherit a social anxiety disorder, but you do inherit certain traits that make SA likely: introversion, hyper-sensitivity to the presence of other people, etc. The friend I mentioned brought his kids over yesterday. He has two, aged about five and seven. It was fascinating to watch them. My friend is supernaturally confident, a total extrovert without a shred of SA. His wife is also a very confident person with lots of friends. The children have clearly inherited this. I hadn't seen them for ages, so I was in effect a complete stranger - a big man with a deep voice in a strange house. Most of the people on this forum would have been intimidated at that age. But the eldest, who is seven or eight (I think), just walked straight in and made herself at home. She wasn't loud or cocky, merely confident and at ease. I guess you could argue that she's learnt to be that way, from observing her parents and being intensely socialized (taken to the pub, taken to parties, etc), but my gut feeling is she inherited it. There was a lack of fear, a lack of self-awareness and sensitivity. She was comfortable, that's the best way I can put it.

When you think about it, so much of life is beyond our control. I guess we have a certain amount of free will, but not much. Genes alone form the basics, or the background, of our personality. When you add in parenting, plus early experiences (being an only child, growing up in a small, isolated family, etc), and combine it with genetics, well, it can take a lifetime to deal with the fallout.
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  #54  
Old 4th June 2019, 22:00
hollowone hollowone is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

@ moksha

The friend you described is definnitely an extrovert, an important point you brought up was (hope you don't mind me quoting) "He never agonizes over what happened, over the stupid things he said or the awkward silences. Neither does he worry whether the people there liked him. And instead of dreading such things for weeks in advance (as I would) he barely thinks about them at all." This is a really interesting point & rings bells.

You can get people who seem outwardly very confident and people who are shy who're like that, you can get people who're outwardly shy and outwardly confident who're not like that at all.

What you've described definitely describes me.

Regards the original topic, I think the keyword here is self-awareness; introverts may have the advantage of gaining higher self-awareness than people who're extroverts.

That point RE zero self-awareness and zero social anxiety regarding, that's what strikes a chord with me. I've noticed the same thing too. I get it can be difficult to not get out your head (like those lucky bastards). but it means you're more at risk of becoming socially-anxious.

There's a difference between not being sure about how to navigate social situations and your natural personality and temperament.

RE the note of social experience
It's also important not to confuse the introverted tendency to analyse a lot with having a lot of social anxiety (though I will say being introverted is a risk factor for social anxiety). Not knowing how to mingle at parties for e.g. here's a metaphor; imagine giving two people a guitar, letting them learn a tune for half an hour, then taking away the guitar for 6 months then expecting a virtuoso performance. Whether they're introverted or extroverted, they'll both be equally rubbish & unsure of what to do. It's the same with social inexperience.
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  #55  
Old 13th June 2019, 18:15
lecha lecha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

I sometimes have the impression that extroverted people can't really appreciate the silence and the beauty of nature around us. Like really be glad to see the colours, beautiful leaves, even all the nice objects that we are lucky to buy for ourselves.
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  #56  
Old 13th June 2019, 18:22
lecha lecha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moksha
A therapist once said to me "you seem to have a very rich inner life," which is true. I can sit for hours lost in my own thoughts. And when I'm in a good mood, that inner world can be a rich and happy place. I have literally walked four miles home immersed in fantasies and daydreams and hardly aware of the time or distance.
I'm like this, too, but I have the problem that if my train of thought is bad, then there's noone there to show me a different perspective. Do you have some method to 'snap out of it' when you are not in the happy place? I did a lot of therapy before, too, but it didnt help with this..
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  #57  
Old 13th June 2019, 18:29
lecha lecha is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HermannHesse
No. No upsides. Not if you're also at least two of the following:

Ugly
Male
Talentless.


Upsides only exist for those who fall out of those categories.

The only upside for those who get the home run is being able to fulfil their Xmas obligations for under 10.
Hey, you are cheating!
Since you are male you get to have no upside with just one other category!
Be well x
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  #58  
Old 13th June 2019, 19:49
R.H.I.N.O. R.H.I.N.O. is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

I hate it if i'm honest. I was very socially anxious as a young man, but mainly overcame that as i got older. Introversion on the other hand, is something i will have to live with for the rest of my life. I like to be alone but crave company and companionship. Think it was Stephen Fry who said " I don't want to be alone, just left alone". That sums me up really and i crave a relationship with a fellow introvert. Where do i find her though? I'm in my late 50's now and can see nothing but loneliness and frustration in my future.
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  #59  
Old 15th June 2019, 21:14
Genetically_Inferior Genetically_Inferior is offline
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Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moksha
I have a friend who is a pure, textbook extrovert. Tuesday evening he phoned and asked if I wanted to go for a coffee. He now works from home and is going crazy from the isolation. So I picked him up about 7:00pm and we went to McDonalds. He didn't want anything in particular, and hadn't much news, he just craved company. When he is near other people, he seems to gain energy and come alive. Being around people is like plugging him into the mains. Anyway, he showed me some photos of him on a stag do with about 20 other guys, all grinning and laddish, who had booked a weekend in Prague. Then he was telling me about some big get together with his wife's family. What really struck me, as it always does, is how much easier life is when you're an extrovert. Of course, he is also incredibly confident and assertive, which helps (presumably you can have a shy, insecure extrovert ). He never agonizes over what happened, over the stupid things he said or the awkward silences. Neither does he worry whether the people there liked him. And instead of dreading such things for weeks in advance (as I would) he barely thinks about them at all.

But it isn't just his extroverted nature that amazes me. We are polar opposites in so many ways: he's an extrovert, I'm an introvert; he likes everyone he meets and barely distinguishes one person from another (I swear he'd have liked Jimmy Saville), I'm hyper- sensitive to different personalities, never miss a thing, and dislike more people than I like; he is high-energy and happy, I'm low energy and melancholic; he is optimistic and looks for things to be excited about, I'm pessimistic to the point of paranoia. I can think of several people who have ZERO self-awareness and absolutely ZERO social anxiety. They astonish me, not because they are chatty and confident but because they are just so ****ing comfortable and relaxed when around others. In fact, these differences between people have amazed me all my life; some are so different it's like comparing a giraffe to a crocodile. And I don't care what anyone says, those differences lie in the genes.
I couldn't agree more with you for saying that for extroverts life is 10 times easier. In my humble opinion, there are no upsides to being an introvert. The most important personality trait in this contemporary society is communication. For us, introverts, it doesn't come natural so we're screwed for the rest of our life. Introverts they just don't fit into social norms that are designed for extroverts to thrive. On importance scale this is how the personality traits are ranked:

1. Communication (extrovert trait)
2. Charisma (extrovert trait)
3. Being outgoing (extrovert trait)


















Massive gap

4. Some introverted traits that nobody cares about

I just don't see how this is going to change. It'll never change. We're gonna die in society like this.
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  #60  
Old 22nd June 2019, 11:32
HaveANiceDay HaveANiceDay is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 161
Default Re: Are there any upsides to being an introvert?

I've not seen any research on this but I would expect introverts to perform better at certain jobs (scientific research, various artistic pursuits). A few years back I looked at moving into engineering research and I decided I wasn't introverted enough; I am right in the middle of the introversion/extraversion scale. It bears repeating that introversion is not the same thing as SA, although a few of the behaviours might seem similar.
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