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  #1  
Old 2nd October 2017, 11:14
Marco Marco is offline
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Default Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

I wonder sometimes if people with “mild” social anxiety, who are somehow able to hide their problem and get by in terms of holding down a job, having the semblance of a social life and so on, can be more resistant to treatment and less likely to be “cured”, simply because there is a degree of stability in their lives. Of course, if people feel that they can work around their problem, they’re probably less likely to seek help in the first place. But even if they do seek that help, for some it’s as if they’re stuck on an uncomfortable ledge and getting off may present more difficulty than for someone, whose life has been blighted by comparison, to pick themselves up from rock bottom.
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Old 2nd October 2017, 13:36
Rebka Rebka is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

I don't think I have severe SA, not in terms of it stopping me from doing things for the most part anyway, but my feelings of anxiety are usually quite severe which confuses me a little bit because I would've thought those feelings would disappear the more I expose myself to things that trigger my anxiety, but those feelings haven't lessened. Which means I go along and do stuff but usually feel anxious, embarrassed, guilty, ashamed and stooopid before, during or after, and all that annoying poop, ha! And then I feel low and defeated by the end of the day, but I just don't think about it, and it passes and I'm fine again, haha!

In the long run feeling all that probably isn't so healthy so I probably should do something about it; I've never really bothered getting help specifically for my SA, but I don't think I'd be resistant to it I manage to push through my anxieties most of the time and stuff but I just haven't managed to squash the anxieties but on the other hand I feel that there's some parts of me that logically no amount of therapy will really help with, because there'll always be that one thing so ultimately there's no point or something, I dunno but that's just me being an idiot poop nugget!

So whether my SA is mild or severe (I don't think it's severe) it does seem to be resistant feelings wise to exposure

Maybe with both severe and mild SA it's sometimes a case of there's always gonna be a little bit of SA or residual SA or something that sticks around after therapy or whatever, and so sometimes the best you can do is just contain it and make sure it doesn't get bigger, or bigger again in the case of those who had severe SA but I don't know what I'm talking about, I never really do with stuff like this, it's why I avoid attempting and ultimately failing to articulate my thoughts on deep meaningful subjects, haha!

Oh and cool, I think I've managed to correctly beak up my paragraphs yay! Usually I end up breaking them up randomly and nonsensically or not at all, but it looks like I've been getting better at it! Haha! Seriously, I wrote a story to submit to Creepypasta and when I proofread it I saw I hadn't spaced the paragraphs at all, so I ended up going through it all spacing it at random just to break it up

Aw man I wanna talk more... I wanna keep talking... nvm I won't
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Old 2nd October 2017, 14:06
Marco Marco is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

Ha ha! I usually keep my posts so short that I don't need to worry about paragraphs.

Good point though, Rebka. Maybe once an SAer, always an SAer - we can never completely rid ourselves of the problem, even if we do have just mild SA. I don't know what I'm talking about either to be honest.
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Old 2nd October 2017, 14:58
Hayman Hayman is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

A very good question! I consider my own Social Anxiety to be reasonably mild. I know there’s people who aren't as bad as I am, but I know there’s many who are worse. There's things I can do (albeit with fear) that I know other's simply can't and there’s other things that fellow members can do without much thought which I still face those 'brick walls'.

Whilst I hold down a full time job, it’s menial and I always live in fear of being laid off. Why? I was made redundant seven years ago that was actually constructive dismissal because in the run-up to that, I was signed off for over a month with anxiety and depression. I struggle to mix into any social circle despite my best efforts and I find if I mention anything to do with Social Anxiety – it’s always laughed off, told I'm making 'excuses' e.t.c… So, even though I do work I often find myself isolated from most people. I think I'm at a stage with 'regular' people where they simply see me as being awkward, rather than facing a genuine issue. This alone heightens the Social Anxiety I have, as there's no understanding or help.

I've seen a few doctors with regards to both Social Anxiety and Depression spanning right back to my days in high school (I’m currently 32). Whilst they accept I do have depressive spells, they won’t officially diagnose me with having Social Anxiety – just general anxiety. In an era where illnesses of this nature are supposedly being more accepted with less stigmas attached, I've personally yet to see if from the medical profession by in large and literally all of general society with their 'dog eat dog' mentality. If you're struggling or not as confident – tough. They’ll still knock you over the moment you think you're starting to climb up from the gutter.

There's certainly a 'grey' area when it comes to Social Anxiety where some people can mask symptoms quite well. An area where we have plenty of traits and symptoms but they’re not so acute where it's not blatantly obvious there's a real problem there... I feel I'm sitting pretty much right slap bang in the middle of this area. So when we go to seek professional help, we aren't given correct treatment/advice/support and are basically told we're all on our own to improve ourselves…
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  #5  
Old 2nd October 2017, 15:10
Marco Marco is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

That's a good point, Hayman, that I forgot to make myself - that if your SA symptoms aren't as overt, you sometimes get less sympathy from others, including medical professionals. I've experienced this too. "You're just shy, next patient!"
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  #6  
Old 4th October 2017, 10:38
gregarious_introvert gregarious_introvert is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

I think it's important to remember that everyone has social anxiety to some level, but the term social anxiety disorder (or general anxiety disorder) indicates a level of anxiety which inhibits the person's life choices. For me, I've always worked (although had difficulty in finding work, tended only to get temp / menial jobs, never managed to remain in a job longer than two years) and been able to have relationships (although these haven't been straightforward either), but I have never, until very recently, been able to handle interpersonal relationships or form friendships.

The level of my social anxiety has fluctuated over the years, from relatively mild to severe (to the point where a simple question from a stranger in the street could reduce me to tears - and of course, the agoraphobic episodes) but always enough to have a major impact on my life. I used to be virtually paranoid, it seemed like the world was conspiring against me because I was "different" (I know now that I was conspiring against myself), so I 'm not sure where the differential is between mild and severe SA - I think they only measure that matters is how much we are able to control our anxiety against how much it controls us - and if it is controlling us (in any area of our lives) then it needs to be resolved, but if not, then perhaps those are within the parameters of normal levels of anxiety which everybody has?
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Old 4th October 2017, 12:41
Carbon(cycle)Fodder Carbon(cycle)Fodder is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marco
I wonder sometimes if people with “mild” social anxiety, who are somehow able to hide their problem and get by in terms of holding down a job, having the semblance of a social life and so on, can be more resistant to treatment and less likely to be “cured”.
I think there's some truth in this,...
I did get a lot better a few years back, but then just seem to have plateaued at a rather unpleasant, unsatisfactory level, rather than kept going from strength to strength.

there's a few reasons (for me personally), but generally, could be that people have developed such strong coping mechanisms, that to pull that particular carpet from under their feet could initially feel like a big step backwards,
as now, another tact is needed and those coping mechanisms abandoned

there's maybe some pride in having coped so well, despite living on the spectrum or having SA/Stress/Depression for long periods,
so, having coped, it's difficult to see that as something that needs changing,

there's a whole new list of things to learn,. how to talk to people, how to form relationships, how to make friends, - the list goes on,..
maybe people with mild SA have a more advantageous comfort zone than say, someone who can't work or is crying every day?
but nonetheless, you can be just as stuck in that comfort zone.
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  #8  
Old 5th October 2017, 10:33
Marco Marco is offline
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Default Re: Can mild SA sometimes be more resistant to treatment than severe SA?

^ That’s really what I was thinking, CCF, but you’ve expressed it so much better!

I fully take your point, GI, about the distinction between having “normal” social anxiety and the disorder; but like so many other mental health problems, it presents a spectrum with a very fuzzy border between being normal (whatever that really is) and disordered. I think some people put up a façade that not only fools others, but I imagine sometimes themselves too, all the while their lives have been subtly compromised and stifled. These are the kind of people I had in mind.
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