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  #421  
Old 21st March 2021, 00:35
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

If the mental illness comes first you can be on a hiding to nothing. It is often found that those who have a mental illness and later get an ASD dx have been treated badly by mental health services.
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  #422  
Old 21st March 2021, 19:14
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

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If a person thinks they might have autism, they will usually see their general practitioner as the first port of call. The GP will use a screening test to help them decide if the person should be referred to a specialist for a formal diagnosis.

However, we recently discovered, by chance, an error in the clinical guidelines doctors use when making their initial autism assessment. That guideline is published by the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice), and it also informs clinical guidelines internationally.
https://theconversation.com/mistake-...agnosis-156909
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  #423  
Old 23rd March 2021, 21:31
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

Autism and ADHD: should special interests be encouraged? With Richard Semmens. (Spoiler alert, yes.)

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bDYegRxfqRE&t=28s
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  #424  
Old 27th March 2021, 17:49
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

This was really interesting to read about these ladies' experiences of seeking diagnosis:

https://metro.co.uk/2021/03/27/too-p...osed-14299958/

It was so sad how she was treated at the beginning, but the outcome is encouraging
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  #425  
Old 7th April 2021, 19:58
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

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ABSTRACT

Increasingly adults over the age of 50 are receiving a diagnosis of autism spectrum condition. Growing up in a time when autism was poorly recognised, these adults have lived unknowingly with the condition and face readjustment. This paper reports the first study to investigate this population. Nine adults over the age of 50, who had recently been diagnosed with ASC, were interviewed, and thematic analysis was used to analyse the transcripts. Results showed that the participants had received treatment for anxiety and depression. They reported ASC behaviours in their childhood and growing up they felt isolated and alien. Receiving a diagnosis was seen as a positive step and allowed for a reconfiguration of self and an appreciation of individual needs. Given the positive aspects of receiving a late diagnosis, more work is needed to identify older adults with undiagnosed ASC.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full...0.2019.1684920
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  #426  
Old 1st May 2021, 15:37
Dougella Dougella is offline
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  #427  
Old 1st May 2021, 17:21
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

A Conceptual Analysis of Autistic Masking

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Abstract

Autistic masking is an emerging research area that focuses on understanding the conscious or unconscious suppression of natural autistic responses and adoption of alternatives across a range of domains. It is suggested that masking may relate to negative outcomes for autistic people, including late/missed diagnosis, mental health issues, burnout, and suicidality. This makes it essential to understand what masking is, and why it occurs. In this conceptual analysis, we suggest that masking is an unsurprising response to the deficit narrative and accompanying stigma that has developed around autism. We outline how classical social theory (i.e., social identity theory) can help us to understand how and why people mask by situating masking in the social context in which it develops. We draw upon the literature on stigma and marginalization to examine how masking might intersect with different aspects of identity (e.g., gender). We argue that although masking might contribute toward disparities in diagnosis, it is important that we do not impose gender norms and stereotypes by associating masking with a “female autism phenotype.” Finally we provide recommendations for future research, stressing the need for increased understanding of the different ways that autism may present in different people (e.g., internalizing and externalizing) and intersectionality. We suggest that masking is examined through a sociodevelopmental lens, taking into account factors that contribute toward the initial development of the mask and that drive its maintenance.
https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/.../aut.2020.0043
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  #428  
Old 3rd May 2021, 17:57
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread



I remember the bullying that occurred on going to the private school equivalent of secondary school. The social rejection for being different. The difficulty coping with the increased expectations of being a teenager. The lack of confidence and self worth that came from incidences like other boys in the class directing monkey chants at me. I’ve learnt to cope a little better, but the psychological effects have never truly gone away. A situation compounded by a mental health system that has been largely more critical and judgemental than supportive. The response from mental health services here in Wiltshire has been a welcome exception to that.
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  #429  
Old 3rd May 2021, 18:46
amara amara is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

^I hope autism really is dealt with better in Schools nowadays. Even 10 years ago, when I was in high School, there was support for ADHD, Autism, dyslexia but there wasn't much awareness with high functioning autism, social anxiety. I still remember two teachers, both that were meant to be a special needs teachers, telling me off for being quiet and shy.
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  #430  
Old 3rd May 2021, 18:52
Tembo Tembo is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

^ It certainly is, generally speaking. I’m sure some schools are still terrible at it, but it’s become much more important and better dealt with. It is good to see dyspraxia getting more attention too.

I remember there still being a massive stigma when I was a child, and people with ADHD, autism, dyslexia were bullied for being ‘thick’, or presumed to be making it up for attention, or to get government benefits. These are the sort of things I heard regularly. There still is a stigma, and I’m sure the average Daily Mail reader still thinks people claim it to get benefits or whatever, but I think society is now much more accepting than was I was at school 15-20 years ago. That’s the impression I get anyway.
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  #431  
Old 3rd May 2021, 19:30
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

My experience was 46+ years ago. Being introverted, shy, timid and bad at sports didn't go down well when the vast majority were brash extroverts, and being good at sports was seen as being next to Godliness.
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  #432  
Old 3rd May 2021, 20:06
amara amara is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tembo
^ It certainly is, generally speaking. I’m sure some schools are still terrible at it, but it’s become much more important and better dealt with. It is good to see dyspraxia getting more attention too.

I remember there still being a massive stigma when I was a child, and people with ADHD, autism, dyslexia were bullied for being ‘thick’, or presumed to be making it up for attention, or to get government benefits. These are the sort of things I heard regularly. There still is a stigma, and I’m sure the average Daily Mail reader still thinks people claim it to get benefits or whatever, but I think society is now much more accepting than was I was at school 15-20 years ago. That’s the impression I get anyway.
It's funny you say that. I had a friend with ADHD and dyslexia who received support and didn't seem ashamed of it, 10-15 years ago. He was bullied a lot in Year 7 but also got angry. The other day I went to the area of my old High School and there was a boy that could be his younger brother, I don't know, now his younger brother would be a teen and two girls who were teens loudly said how he had ADHD so he must be confident. It was being seen in a positive light, this wouldn't have happened really 10-15 years ago.
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  #433  
Old 6th May 2021, 15:37
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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  #434  
Old 12th May 2021, 12:42
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

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Atypical sensory perception occurs in up to 90 per cent of autistic people—despite this, the dominant view of autism as primarily a “social” condition.
This has led to sensory symptoms being largely overlooked, particularly in neuroimaging research.
https://www.psychiatry.cam.ac.uk/blo...um-conditions/
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  #435  
Old 12th May 2021, 12:50
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

Yes, I've read that: Nuerotypical people think the biggest issue with being autistic is social communication etc, where as autistic people say their biggest issue is the sensory stuff.

It makes sense as nuerotypical people have to deal with the social aspects of it more, or can spot it more easily, where as the sensory stuff seems to be harder to see or understand.
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  #436  
Old 13th May 2021, 01:34
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

#ActuallyAutistic NTs tend to think I'm weird. Highly vocal NDs can be intimidating. Many from both groups make me feel ill at ease.Both can be demanding &intolerant.
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  #437  
Old 27th May 2021, 12:32
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

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A new paper published in the BMJ by researcher Amber Ruigrok has found that autistic people experienced significant barriers when accessing COVID-19 services.



Despite being at elevated risk of severe illness due to co-occurring health conditions, there was a lack of accessibility of COVID-19 testing.

https://www.psychiatry.cam.ac.uk/blo...tistic-people/
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  #438  
Old 1st June 2021, 10:46
amara amara is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

With me not being comfortable with myself as a person I think it was slowly taught that I had to be a certain way. I say this because people who seem more comfortable to express themselves vocally, not necessarily in other ways, really don’t seem to mind coming across messy, imperfect.

I wonder if being able to stim without much shame makes us more comfortable with expressing ourselves on the whole? I use to naturally stim but my mum use to constantly tell me off for it. I was told other things were wrong that I did growing up, things that are natural behaviours.

Maybe this discomfort with expressing myself is a form of making but then also not feeling okay with the fact that I don’t always know how to interact.
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  #439  
Old 1st June 2021, 15:46
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

^ It's unfortunate that a lot of children were automatically told to sit still or stop "fidgeting" by their parents and so had to suppress their natural behaviours that actually help them to regulate or process, or even learn and concentrate.
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  #440  
Old 2nd June 2021, 07:48
firemonkey firemonkey is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

Early emerging autism spectrum disorder symptom levels often declined across development, according to an analysis of a prospective population-based cohort published in American Journal of Psychiatry.

However, impairment continued to manifest into adulthood for certain individuals.


https://www.healio.com/news/psychiat...=3640963268474

Masking? Avoiding things you couldn't avoid as a child?
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  #441  
Old 2nd June 2021, 11:10
Tonkin Tonkin is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

I don't think it mentioned if they did something like ABA which they say reduces the symptoms of autism.

If they didn't go ABA then it could suggest that ABA isn't that effective as the symptoms decline any way.
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  #442  
Old 2nd June 2021, 16:38
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

^ ABA is pretty contraversial, particularly among autistic individuals themselves. The idea of reducing autistic symptoms itself can be tricky because on one hand if autistic meltdowns are reduced because the autistic person has found ways that they can avoid sensory overload etc, with using headphones for example that could be positive. On the other hand trying to reduce someone's stimming, which is one of the most obvious autistic symptoms, could actually be harmful for that person.
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  #443  
Old 3rd June 2021, 08:48
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

When I used to teach I often heard ABA referred to as dog training for children with autism You're right Dougella that it is controversial.
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  #444  
Old 3rd June 2021, 09:10
Nanuq Nanuq is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

Yes, a lot of ABA techniques, particularly in America where it's done quite aggressively, can be seen as punishing someone for having autism.
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  #445  
Old 3rd June 2021, 12:25
Tonkin Tonkin is offline
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Yes, it sounds brutal but is the main option for getting help for parents with autism in America.

I think the guy that invented it also invented or pioneered gay conversion therapy.

https://stopabasupportautistics.home...rsion-therapy/
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  #446  
Old 3rd June 2021, 15:52
Nanuq Nanuq is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

He sounds like a delight
I expect he feels everyone should be just like him then. Is he white too? Should we all be white, male, neurotypical and straight?
Would that make me a perfect human?
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  #447  
Old 3rd June 2021, 17:06
Dougella Dougella is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

^^ I have read about very disturbing uses of ABA where people with autism were given electric shocks if they did something "wrong", and not even something dangerous or hurtful which wouldn't be acceptable either anyway! I know that autistic adults have been speaking out about how going through ABA therapy as a child was very damaging for them.
It's supposed to be much better these days and doesn't involve punishments, but still training a child seems wrong on many levels.
There are therapies like speech therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy that can help with things that a child might be struggling with without taking that approach.
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  #448  
Old 9th June 2021, 15:59
amara amara is offline
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Default Re: The Autism and Asperger's Thread

People are scary
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